Author: Feet in 2 Worlds

Bio: Feet in 2 Worlds (Fi2W) is an independent media outlet, journalism training program, and launchpad for emerging immigrant journalists and media makers of color. Our work brings positive and meaningful change to America's newsrooms and has a broader impact on how immigration is reported and the ethnic and racial composition of news organizations.

Contributions:

New Call for Pitches for “Immigrants in a Divided Country”

Posted on: 19 Nov 2022

Feet in 2 Worlds is looking for stories for its online series, “Immigrants in a Divided Country,” exploring the current political landscape from the perspective of immigrants (including citizens, legal residents and undocumented people). We are interested in pitches that illustrate how some of the big issues dominating and polarizing the national dialogue play out […]

What We Gained and What We Lost in Covid

Posted on: 20 Sep 2022

Four stories in English and Spanish from bilingual journalists

Worthy of Telling Our Own Story

Posted on: 12 Mar 2022

A live conversation with three Feet in 2 Worlds journalists about their work serving multiple audiences in both Spanish and English.

Whose Chinatown? “A Better Life?” Podcast

Posted on: 18 Nov 2021

Covid highlights long-standing divisions in an iconic L.A. neighborhood

Getting it Right: “A Better Life?” Podcast

Posted on: 11 Nov 2021

Confronting Covid Misinformation in Immigrant Communities

On the Sidelines: “A Better Life?” Podcast

Posted on: 04 Nov 2021

How did Covid affect immigrant workers in major league sports?

Tested: “A Better Life?” Podcast

Posted on: 28 Oct 2021

Latino Students in North Carolina Return to the Classroom

I Want to Stay Here, Just Not Forever: “A Better Life?” Podcast

Posted on: 21 Oct 2021

Covid’s impact on an international student in Wyoming

Delivering Community: “A Better Life?” Podcast

Posted on: 14 Oct 2021

“My dream is that, as essential workers in this city, we are protected and can live without fear.”

Searching for Solace: “A Better Life?” Podcast

Posted on: 07 Oct 2021

Jasmine Jiwani kneels at her husband’s gravestone at a cemetery in Lawrenceville, Georgia. She never thought—coming to America from East Africa a decade ago—that one day she would have to mourn alone.

Jiwani is part of Atlanta’s large Ismaili Muslim community, which believes in the power of communal prayer to worship and heal. Covid restrictions prevented the community from gathering for the funeral of her husband, who died of Covid.